Closing the Gap: DoD Conference on Re-Entry for Women Veterans into Cybersecurity Careers

A One-Day Virtual Conference - May 25, 2021

Closing the Gap Conference: Women Vets Re-Entry into Cybersecurity Careers

Through a DoD grant awarded to GW CSPRI and WiE, a virtual conference is being designed to help women veterans enter the cybersecurity workforce.

Summary: Through a DoD grant awarded to The George Washington University Centers for Cyber Security and Privacy Research (CSPRI) and Women in Engineering (WiE), a virtual conference is being designed to help women veterans enter the cybersecurity workforce. The conference package will include:

  • A pre-Conference Briefing Book/Digital Notebook
  • A one-day virtual Conference, to be held May 25, 2021
  • A post-Conference Summary and resources
  • Opportunities for attendees to provide resources and suggestions

Closing the Gap: A DoD conference on Re-entry for Women Veterans into Cybersecurity Careers addresses the crucial need to fill the exponentially growing cybersecurity gap (whether it is a talent gap of skilled cybersecurity workers or a gap in the time between jobs in the military and the cyberworkforce), as well as to address the gender imbalance in the field.

The conference is specifically designed for researchers, educators and decision-makers from academia, government and industry, focusing on issues and practices for smoothing the reentry for women veterans into the workforce, specifically in cybersecurity careers. Women veterans are also encouraged to participate.

 

In order for the United States to remain a world leader in various fields of science and technology, we need a robust and educated cyber-workforce. The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS.org, January 2019) noted that “A recent CSIS survey of IT decision makers across eight countries found that 82 percent of employers report a shortage of cybersecurity skills, and 71 percent believe this talent gap causes direct and measurable damage to their organizations. According to CyberSeek, an initiative funded by the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE), the United States faced a shortfall of almost 314,000 cybersecurity professionals as of January 2019. To put this in context, the country’s total employed cybersecurity workforce is just 716,000. According to data derived from job postings, the number of unfilled cybersecurity jobs has grown by more than 50 percent since 2015. By 2022, the global cybersecurity workforce shortage has been projected to reach upwards of 1.8 million unfilled positions.

Women veterans are well positioned to fill this gap. 

Top 5 Veteran Technical Skills

“Closing the Gap” refers to either a talent gap of skilled cybersecurity workers or a gap in the time between jobs in the military and the cyber-workforce. Closing the Gap is a working conference combining presentations and discussions focusing on the research in cyber workforce development and gender issues. By bringing together a variety of stakeholders in this topic, the conference will address how to overcome challenges in recruitment, representation and retention of women veterans in the cybersecurity workforce. 

Being available to enter the workforce is not the same as being ready or equipped with the understanding of issues, challenges, barriers or strategies to re-entry, and in fact surveys by the Student Veterans Organization (SVA) report veterans pursuing and reporting interest in pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering, math and medicine (STEMM) degrees is higher than the rate of those graduating. There are therefore opportunities before and during transition from the military, during recruitment and enrollement in college, and during college, to impact the choices of women veterans and bring them to opportunities in cybersecurity.

The aim of the conference is to help women veterans:

  • Leverage prior knowledge in order to enter or return to cybersecurity fields 
  • Move from the military to non-military environments, including addressing issues of gender inequality and sexism in the workplace 
  • Fit into White Collar, Blue Collar, or New Collar jobs (new work paradigms that are changing models of the workplace)  

 

 

In addition to the one-day working conference, Closing the Gap will result in a robust set of resources:

  • A pre-Conference Briefing Book/Digital Notebook, citing established research and background on reentry of women veterans into cybersecurity, along with material drawn from the research on women in STEMM
  • An assembly of experts in the field, focusing on their personal assessment of why the gap still exists, and what they might do differently hearing from other experts in the room
  • The explicit inclusion of gender-based approaches to both establish a network of professionals and academics, and to hone specific strategies for implementation of a reentry plan for women veterans
  • Publication of a post-conference Summary, to include resources, references, findings, recommendations and action steps
  • Accessible website repository of resources and materials

 

 

To receive updates or to participate, please sign up here. You'll be alerted when conference registration opens as well as when updates and new resources are made available. 

The conference will be live-streamed and recorded. Stakeholders and attendees will receive the pre-Conference Briefing Book/Digital Notebook, the post-Conference Summary, and access to resources. 

Panelists To be Announced. 

Watch for details on how to register for this virtual event.

 

 

1. Leveraging prior knowledge to enable return to cybersecurity fields

A problem in reentry is often that the vocabulary of the two groups (those seeking reentry and those offering education or employment) may not be on the same wavelength. The groups often use different terms for the same or similar issues, but neither group appreciates the other’s information. Whether a woman is seeking to complete a degree or move into the workforce, the focus of this session is how to establish the existence of re-entry programs, courses and experiences, and how to adapt or adopt them to return to education options or to the workforce. The education being sought could range from a few refresher courses, to a certificate to an undergraduate or graduate degree.  The key questions to be addressed include:

  • How does one gain academic credit for any prior education or experiences?
  • How does one highlight and present prior experiences in terms of workforce skill sets?
  • How does a woman who has taken a break from her career keep her tech skills up to date while in the Gap?

 

2. Moving from a military to non-military environment and issues of gender and sexism in cybersecurity workplace

This session is specifically directed at challenges facing women veterans. Many have been in the service for years; 10 or 20 years is not unusual. Furthermore, multiple deployments are common. The military environment has a unique culture and its own set of terms and references, not to mention acronyms. Learning to work or study in a new culture is difficult. This session will focus on best practices for a successful transition. Key questions to be addressed in brainstorming sessions include:

  • What are the available resources to make the move from a military career to a non-military environment?
  • How do military operating specialties (MOS) translate into civilian job descriptions?
  • How is the non-military environment different from a military environment?
  • What are some of the ways in which woman vets can prepare themselves?
  • What are examples of a successful transition? What does it look like?
  • What is successful mentoring?
  • How do women service members make successful transitions to a cybersecurity workforce or career?
  • What are the appropriate academic programs available?
  • How do women service members translate their military experiences into viable content for resumes for cybersecurity positions in the civilian sector?
  • What are best practices for advancing women through the “pipeline” toward a cybersecurity-focused position?
  • What aspects of unconscious bias training can (or should) be provided for educators, supervisors and career employment officers?
  • What structural barriers are women faced with in advancing their careers?
  • What are successful mentoring and networking practices to support women succeeding in cybersecurity workforce positions?

3. White Collar, Blue Collar, New Collar: New Work Paradigms

This session will address the changing landscape of the jobs available in the cybersecurity workforce, the backgrounds needed and the current trend in upskilling or improving workers’ IT skills. We use the term “White Collar’ to address the typical Bachelor's degree in cybersecurity, computer science, information assurance, programming, etc. route to a technical position; “Blue Collar” to address the cyber-equipment repair technicians as well as other repair jobs necessary in secure facilities; and finally “New Collar” to address the new 21st century workforce of online jobs as well as retraining from one field to another. This is particularly important for women who have been in a gap from work or school. Cybersecurity and related technology fields change rapidly, and upskilling or apprenticeships might be the remediation needed. We will also consider returnships, and internships for adults returning to the workforce after taking time away from a career.

There is also a new focus on workforce job descriptions and a framework to match skills to jobs.  Leading the way from the federal agency side is the NIST/NICE “Cybersecurity Workforce Framework” 800-181 that allows this crosswalk. To the veteran looking to enter the field, this framework can be a major convenience as military duty assignments in information technology and assurance may not have defined the skill sets now being recognized as important academic elements for preparation. Job titles and responsibilities can help identify skill gaps in ways that the veteran feels comfortable.  Closing the Gap will create the beginning of a list that will enable a veteran to self assess and identify gaps needed to address in order to prepare for a cybersecurity job and for college admission or corporate leaders to match the veteran’s skills with the requirements.

Key questions to be addressed:

  • How does a company successfully establish a returnship?
  • What does the experience of gaining new skills entail?
  • How can you use it to strengthen and broaden your skill base?
  • Are there new strategies to present an individual’s skills and capabilities in cybersecurity to a recruiter, other than the traditional “Bachelor’s Degree” requirement?
  • How can a company utilize women’s overall experiences to fully take advantage of their skill sets, while also helping them develop new skill bases?

 

The Conference is jointly organized by the GW Centers for Cyber Security and Privacy Research Institute (CSPRI) and Women in Engineering (WiE). Advisors with expertise in veterans' affairs, the military, cybersecurity and academia are assisting with the development of Conference programming and resources.

Project Directors and Grant Principal Investigators

Shelly Heller, PhD
Director, GW SEAS Center for Women in Engineering (WiE), GW

Costis Toregas, PhD
Director, GW Cyber Security and Privacy Research Institute (CSPRI), GW

Project Administration

Taly Walsh
Assistant Director, GW SEAS Center for Women in Engineering (WiE)